Natural Foods Network Newsletter

01.19.2007

Grocers Help Consumers Find Healthy Choices/7-Up removes 100% Natural Claim

Fresh off the e-press:

Grocers Will Help Consumers Find Healthy Foods

January 16, 2007
By Holly Case
Natural Food Network Newsletter Editor

Considering that grocery stores in America have a staggering number of breakfast cereals alone and that a similar number of choices exist in almost every product category, it can be difficult for consumers seeking healthier choices to find what they're looking for amidst all the available options. Recognizing this, grocery manufacturers and product associations have created a new program that will guide shoppers to the healthier options in the grocery store.

The new program, called "Take A Peak", will help shoppers follow the revised USDA food pyramid. The program will allow for the placement of signs throughout grocery stores that will guide consumers to the healthiest options. In addition, signs will be placed in grocery aisles that will advise shoppers about choosing food items containing less fat and sugar. Other planned ideas include integrating weekly price specials with the pyramid goals, so that budget-conscious shoppers don't have to sacrifice their health concerns while trying to trim a few dollars from their total bills.

The idea behind the new program is that reaching consumers while they're in the store selecting their food purchases is the best time to help them make the best possible choices.



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Cadbury Schweppes Drops "100% Natural" Claim from 7UP

January 15, 2007
By Holly Case
Natural Food Network Newsletter Editor

Because there are few guidelines governing the use of the label "natural" when it comes to many products in the USA, some might say that it creates a loophole that companies try to exploit. But in the absence of official regulations, consumer pressure can shape standards regarding the use of the natural label.

Cadbury Schweppes was one such company that recently chose to adopt the label "100% Natural" for their 7UP sodas. Nearly as soon as they made this announcement, many consumers were upset about what they felt was a misuse of the natural label. The watchdog and advocacy group Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) complained about the label as well, and their pressure led to Cadbury Schweppes' decision to drop the 100% Natural label from 7UP products.

The company used the label in part because the main ingredients are natural in origin, but the particularly controversial ingredient high fructose corn syrup has been heavily processed and no longer resembles the corn from which it originated. In addition, some health experts have linked high fructose corn syrup to the dramatic rise in type 2 diabetes in the United States.

The "natural" label has also impacted another beverage manufacturer, Kraft Foods, for making similar claims about their Capri Sun drink pouches. A woman has sued the company over the label, stating that it misleads consumers into believing that the product contains a high percentage of juice, when in fact it contains very little (if any) juice.

Cadbury Schweppes will change the labels for 7UP and rather than saying that the product is 100% natural, the new labels will highlight the natural ingredients that are not so controversial.


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